Himeji #8 – Himeji Castle (姫路城)

Himeji Castle is really a castle that doesn’t mess around. It was built in part to rival Osaka castle and keep Central and Western Japan under control:

Himeji Castle - Keep walls

In the Meiji Period (1868 to 1912) Himeji Castle was to be torn down under the government policy but it was saved by a Colonel Nakamura Shigeto of the Army:

Himeji Castle - Catsle keep

During WWII a bomb was dropped on the main tower, but miraculously, the bomb did not go off and the castle was not damaged:

Himeji Castle - Keep with tree

And it also features these guys:

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Himeji #6 – Himeji Castle (姫路城)

Himeji Castle is one of only twelve remaining original castles in Japan, and really is the most magnificent of all of them. It was recently renovated over several years and re-opened in 2015. It is truly deserving of its World Heritage status:

Himeji Castle - Plaque

Himiji Castle - Rickshaw

Himeji Castle - Bridge Over Moat

Himeji Castle - Gate

Himeji Castle - Walls

Himeji #4 – Kōkoen Garden (好古園)

The eight smaller gardens are surrounded by formal walls and linked by passages. This one has also been featured on several TV dramas:

Kokoen - passage

Every now and then you get a glimpse of the white walls of the main castle:

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Edo-style gardens (1603-1867) are characterized as ‘strolling’ gardens which featured ponds, islands and small hills with meandering paths. This was one of the smaller ponds:

Kokoen - small garden pond

Kokoen - smaller garden stream

The garden offered certain viewpoints which often featured ‘borrowed landscape’ such as the castle:

Kokoen - smaller garden castle view

Keeping an eye on us:

Kokoen - smaller garden crow

Cherry blossoms:

Kokoen - smaller garden cherry blossom

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Kokoen - cherry blossom

Himeji #1

On a short break we took the Shinkansen down to Himeji, in Hyogo just outside Osaka, to see the castle which had recently been cleaned and so was back to a bright white colour – hence its nickname “White Egret Castle”. The castle, a World Heritage site and the largest castle in Japan, dates back to a hill-fort built in 1333 and the castle seen today was built in 1601-1609. In 1871 it was bought at auction for 23 yen (about US$2,258 today)!

This is the castle seen along the main drag from the station:

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Sculpture along the street:

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The castle with the bridge across the moat and main gate:

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Selling ice-cream near the souvenir shops:

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